For the dialogue between migrant organizations to translate into concrete actions, proactive, critical, and proactive participation is needed. This requires institutionally strong organizations that have a solid work team in charge of formulating agreements that are reflected in specific programs and monitoring them. Therefore, it is essential to institutionally strengthen and consolidate migrant organizations. It is also necessary to develop their technical and methodological abilities and skills to design development strategies, programs and projects.

This represents one of the great challenges for migrant organizations, particularly those in the United States, which is why it is essential to strengthen clubs and federations. A second challenge identified by Rivera – Salgado and Bada (2010) is that many migrant leaders work in isolation, basically without support. This is due to several reasons, some related to the topic addressed in the previous paragraph and others related to the lack of access to financing resources, as well as the lack of new leadership in the migrant community. A third challenge that can be identified is how to ensure that the advocacy processes of these organizations are structured in such a way that they are channeled through a single voice, but that includes the plurality of visions and objectives, and at the same time respond to local demands. We also find ourselves facing challenges of a structural nature. Consider, for example, the conditions in which civil society works in Mexico: How to encourage people to work in civil organizations? In our country, the number of people who work in social organizations is quite low, especially when compared to other countries. According to Solomon, et. al., only 0.4% of the Economically Active Population in Mexico works in civil organizations (2003). It is worth noting that this percentage includes people who volunteer in Mexico, and not just those who get paid for their work. Consider, for example, the conditions in which civil society works in Mexico: How to encourage people to work in civil organizations? In our country, the number of people who work in social organizations is quite low, especially when compared to other countries. According to Solomon, et. al., only 0.4% of the Economically Active Population in Mexico works in civil organizations (2003). It is worth noting that this percentage includes people who volunteer in Mexico, and not just those who get paid for their work. Consider, for example, the conditions in which civil society works in Mexico: How to encourage people to work in civil organizations? In our country, the number of people who work in social organizations is quite low, especially when compared to other countries. According to Solomon, et. al., only 0.4% of the Economically Active Population in Mexico works in civil organizations (2003). It is worth noting that this percentage includes people who volunteer in Mexico, and not just those who get paid for their work. especially when compared to other countries. According to Solomon, et. al., only 0.4% of the Economically Active Population in Mexico works in civil organizations (2003). It is worth noting that this percentage includes people who volunteer in Mexico, and not just those who get paid for their work. especially when compared to other countries. According to Solomon, et. al., only 0.4% of the Economically Active Population in Mexico works in civil organizations (2003). It is worth noting that this percentage includes people who volunteer in Mexico, and not just those who get paid for their work.

In this vein, it is necessary to place the issue of promoting gender equity in migrant civil society in the first order of priorities. Women have a leading role to play. According to estimates by the National Institute of Geography and Statistics (INEGI) of the Mexican population living in the United States, 56.1% are men and 43.9% women. It is necessary that both the promoters of binational organizations and the organizations themselves adopt proactive equity policies, for which a multiplicity of tools can be considered, such as quotas, leadership workshops and projects specifically designed for women.